Tag Archives: J.H. Williams III

Hickman, Ribic & J.H. Williams III Join DC’s Rebirth

DC_Rebirth

When DC made their big Rebirth creative teams reveal last weekend at Wonder Con, one title was conspicuously absent: Super Sons. At the time, some speculated that DC had something major in store for fans which believed merited its own announcement. This morning, DC confirmed such theories by stating that Super Sons will be handled by the all-star creative team of Jonathan Hickman, Esad Ribic & J.H. Williams III

Hickman and DC Co-Publisher Dan Didio discussed how the project came to be and what readers can expect from it.

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“A New Aeon of Blackness”: The Possession (and Politics) of Sonny Baskerville in ‘Promethea’

Sixteen years ago, in the pages of the comic Promethea, writer Alan Moore and artist J. H. Williams III (with inker Mick Gray, colorist Jeromy Cox, and letterer Todd Klein) satirized the American public’s desire for tough, colorful politicians and political spectacle. The creative team did so by depicting the travails of a supporting character — the demonically-possessed New York City mayor, Sonny Baskerville. Moore uses Baskerville’s possession to comment on the American public’s shallow political interests and the appeal of brash politicians.

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This Year’s Finest 2015: The Best Single Issues

Comics in their essence are a serialized art form. We might discuss arcs and runs, trading waiting and so on, yet , most comics are still centered on the experience of reading individual chapters parceled out over a (typically) monthly basis. With this in mind, I offer my third annual list of the year’s most memorable single issues.

I start with my choices for the two very best:

Sandman Overture 6 J.H. Williams III
J.H. Williams III

Sandman Overture #6 by Neil Gaiman & J.H. Williams III:  Dream’s cosmic journey across a universe (or two) came to a stunning conclusion in this issue. The issue contained several callbacks to Gaiman’s classic work, yet not none of them felt like self-serving fan service. Instead they enriched even further the fascinating personalities of the Dream Lord and his siblings. At the same time, Gaiman offered  a story where the stakes were huge. Williams more than ably met the challenge of Gaiman’s script handing in page after page of stunning art. His detailed, imaginative work defied any traditional sense of page layouts, spilling the action in all directions. Rarely have words and pictures blended so well to create a truly emotional experience on an epic scale. For more, read Cosmo’s staff review.
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The Years Finest 2015: The Ten Best Artists

Without the art, it’s a script not a comic. These were our ten favorite illustrators of 2015 Continue reading The Years Finest 2015: The Ten Best Artists

Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed and Something Queued: Greg Rucka’s Female Detectives

ruckafeaturedIn this segment I will be highlighting a variety of work. Something old is a book from my shelf I have read in the past. Something new is a new comic series I am excited about. Something borrowed is a book I do not own and have borrowed to read specifically for this segment. Something queued is a book I have now placed in the “to-read” pile as a result of the previous three. Every now and then I will pop something off the queue and write about it.  This week I am highlighting Greg Rucka, specifically his stories with strong female detectives. (Technically they aren’t all “detectives” but investigative work is done).

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