Tag Archives: Michael Moreci

Indubitable Issues and Pull List (03/16/16)

LOOKING FOR BOOKS TO BUY THIS WEEK?  

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HERE ARE SOME ISSUES THAT WILL NOT DISAPPOINT.

 
Dean’s Recommendations …
RocheLimitMonadic1Roche Limit Monadic #1
“Roche Limit is back with it’s third and final arc. If you have read the first two arcs you are dying to get your hands on this one. If you haven’t read the first two arcs, don’t worry this is a perfect place to jump in.”
 
 

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Indubitable Issues and Pull List (10/14/15)

LOOKING FOR BOOKS TO BUY THIS WEEK?  

LOOK NO FURTHER.  

HERE ARE SOME ISSUES THAT WILL NOT DISAPPOINT.

 
Tyler’s Recommendations: 
672835_f662a1421a23433cf88241c86f05a7df03f8a1f7

Twilight Children #1
“Darwyn Cooke is drawing a new comic. I repeat, Darwyn Cooke is drawing a new comic!! If that’s not enough for you, it’s written by Gilbert Hernandez. Unbridled excitement is the proper response.”
 

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Advance Review of Transference #1

Transference 1 Ron Salas
Ron Salas

By Michael Moreci & Ron Salas

Transference opens with what appears to be an overly familiar narrative sequence. Three espionage agents are driving through France. They are searching for an enigmatic terrorist named Fasad. Team leader Colton is weary of this mission, though. They have no intel on Fasad, while he seems to know way too much about them. This is not how it normally works. Something is askew. So far, so good. We have all seen this type of story play out in one form or another before. Suddenly, though, a commuter train explodes into flames, and Agent Jordon is shouting warnings about preserving the time line. Colton and associates are no longer standard issue spies.

After this prologue, the story flashes back to the present. Moreci gives readers a taste of how Colton normally operates. He has been charged with making sure that an entitled rich man allows his wife to leave him. See, she wishes to pursue her own life, become a heart surgeon, a heart surgeon which one day will save the life of a very important patient. That individual’s life cannot be put in jeopardy. In such a way, Moreci introduces into his story issues of causality, along with questions of destiny. These quandaries only become more pronounced as the narrative continues to unfold.
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Indubitable Issues

LOOKING FOR BOOKS TO BUY THIS WEEK?  

LOOK NO FURTHER.  

HERE ARE SOME ISSUES THAT WILL NOT DISAPPOINT.

 
Patrick slings for…
cSpider-Verse #2
Perhaps the most surprising in a series of surprisingly great Secret Wars tie-ins is Spider-Verse. One of the coolest in the Secret Wars cannon, writer Mike Costa arrives here doing a Spider-Gwen story that captures the spirit of the fan favorite (& currently superior) Spiderman without feeling derivitive of Latour & Rodriguez work while artist Andre Lima Aruajo visual narrative is a dynamic, vibrant & exciting in it’s fast paced and def defying visual story telling. The coolest thing to happen to Spiderman since Spider-Gwen
 

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Indubitable Issues

LOOKING FOR BOOKS TO BUY THIS WEEK?  

LOOK NO FURTHER.  

HERE ARE SOME ISSUES THAT WILL NOT DISAPPOINT.

 
Reed has deja vu…
cChrononauts #1
 
.again it read to time in back traveled I much so it enjoyed and it read I
 

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Review of Roche Limit Clandestiny #1

Roche Lmit Clandestiny 1By Michael Moreci, Kyle Charles & Vic Malhotra

I was a big fan of the first volume of Roche Limit. I picked issue #1 as week’s finest. If you were not able to read the first volume of Roche Limit, do not worry, you do not need it for this volume. The characters and the mission is all new. What Moreci is doing, is creating a world where many stories can be told were each will be about the reach of man exceeding his grasp. It will highlight how the very human nature that drove us to achieve great things will also destroy us as we do not learn from previous mistakes and let the power of discovery be our ultimate downfall.

This first issue is a typical space expedition gone wrong in the very same nature as Alien and Prometheus. If the story is going to start very typical then the character development has to carry the beginning of the book. Moreci does this brilliantly in the opening pages of Clandestiny. Open on a Mom in a space ship talking to her daughter and husband via computer uplink. She is answering their questions, and asking ones of her own. It isn’t until she starts reciting their answers before they give them, that you realize she is watching a tape. As tear’s fill her eyes, the recording ends and announces that the message is two years, seven months and four days old. A beautifully sad moment right off the top to give those heart strings a little tug. The rest of the book follow a typical alien planet discovery crew; there ship crashes, they explore the planet and find a forest in the middle of it where technically life should not exist. In the sky above the forest is a bright burning ball of gas, much like the one in the previous volume of Roche Limit.

Once you hit the back matter of this book it all starts to come together. We read a news story of a robot named Danny. A robot that ended up being sentenced to “death” after killing it’s creators daughter. With no understand and frankly a fear of understanding why the robot would do this, it was destroyed. We find out that the company that made Danny is the same company that developed a colony on Dispater. The two greatest advancements of man, have both been deemed complete failures.

This is a great sci fi story, in the nature of Prometheus but instead of aliens as the threat, it appears that the threat is the power thirst of man which makes for a very interesting start to the second volume of Roche Limit.

– Dean

Burning Fields #3 Review

BurningFields3

by Michael Moreci, Tim Daniel, and Colin Lorimer

Dana and Abon are still searching for the serial killer of Kirkuk, with help from a cult that Abon had quit previously. Meanwhile, (what I believe is) ISIS almost starts a riot in the city square which leads to Verge violently stopping it. The issue ends with the killer claiming a victim, who had previously helped Dana and Abon in their investigation.

Lormier’s art is very atmospheric with its thick lines and plentiful shadows. The art gives the book a strong noir tone, even in the bright sunlight.

The pieces are beginning to come together, with rising tension three issues in. The political overtones give an all-too-real theme to the book that approaches topics others are too afraid to discuss. If I could recommend one book/series this year, I’m banking on this one. It’s a mix of True Detective and Pride of Baghdad, but feels like its own entity. With 5 more issues to go, there’s room for the story to get drawn out or veer off into left field but so far the creative team has done a superb job with the story. It’s not too late to catch up and jump on to this mini, there’s alot to enjoy and it feels like nothing else on the stands.

Rating: Poor, Fair, Good, Great, Excellent

Review of Burning Field #1

BurningFields1by Michael Moreci & Colin Lorimer

Burning Field #1 feels like something I should like but it left me cold and I really can’t pinpoint why that is. It’s a story about a down and out military vet that’s a detective in Chicago who get’s recruited by one of her fellow colleagues that’s now in the private sector to investigate a series of ritualistic murders being committed in and around an oil field in Iraq that’s owned by a multinational US company. Writer Michael Moreci does the fantastic Roche Limit for Image and you can see him getting at some of the same themes as that book but it lacks the high concept or hook from the characters to really bring you in the way Roche Limit does. Some of it borders on cliché or ridiculous but it’s not so bad to be a distraction. Perhaps more problematic is the illustration that is going for pulp but feels sort of flat and lifeless. It’s not bad but it’s not really good either. I’m sure there is an audience for Burning Fields but I’m not it in spite of my expectations. All in all it’s an average comic book that should be better. It’s a great idea on the surface without any great idea’s to carry that forward.