Tag Archives: Moebius

Change Is The Only Constant: Moebius & The World Of Edena

_20161104_015716Jean Giraud aka Moebius could arguably be the greatest creator in the history of the comics medium with some considerations. Purely as an artist, Moebius is among the most technically adept of all time and his visual narrative was never less then fantastic with his detailed character acting and supreme fluidity of movement within his highly detailed compositions. As a storyteller, his imagination was boundless while his gift for humanism and allegory within his expansive narrative constructs was unparalleled. Outside of his unreal technical cartooning abilities; Moebius had a gift for comics where it’s surrealism, science fiction and fantasy intertwined with boundless imagination and concepts. But while Moebius’s sphere of influence on the medium itself is undeniable, all encompassing and monumental, the awareness for his work among comic book readers lags due to issues of distribution and rights ownership. As the Moebius estate partnered with American publisher Dark Horse Comics in 2015; the iconic cartoonist work will soon be more readily available in the english language then ever before. That began with the release of last week’s The World Of Edena Hardcover. A sprawling collection of work that had been created with over a decade of lag time towards it’s conclusion and it’s final chapters being translated into English for the very first time; The World Of Edena is quintessential Moebius. Continue reading Change Is The Only Constant: Moebius & The World Of Edena

Tuesday Top Fifteen: Our Favorite Creators Patrick

Nothing But Comics is about to hit our three year mark and in observance of the site’s anniversary, every Tuesday from now until we finish, one of our staff members will list off their favorite comics creators all time. This week it’s Patrick Continue reading Tuesday Top Fifteen: Our Favorite Creators Patrick

Tuesday Top Ten: All Time Favorites Patrick

Nothing But Comics is about to hit our two year mark and in observance of the sites anniversary, every Tuesday from now until we finish, one of our staff members will list off their favorite series, runs or issues of all time. This week it’s Patrick Continue reading Tuesday Top Ten: All Time Favorites Patrick

Review of The Dying & The Dead #1

The Dying and the Dead 1by Jonathan Hickman & Ryan Bodenheim

If there was a comics Mount Rushmore we know the faces that will be up there. Will Eisner first, Jack Kirby chomping a cigar second and Alan Moore being chisled out on the end with just enough lee way to shape Grant Morrison, Brian K Vaughan or Warren Ellis in his spot when it’s all said and done. In between all those there has to Moebius, the French cartoonist whose work is probably more important now than ever before. Think about it this way, there is superhero knock off Image comics of it’s inception and then there is Image Comics of today and the current version that we are seeing does not exist without the enduring influence of Moebius. It’s in Saga, Starlight, Prophet, Drifter, ODY-C, Pretty Deadly, Black Science, Low, Change, it’s certainly in Jonathan Hickman’s East Of West and it’s even deeper ingrained in Hickman’s new series The Dying & The Dead with artist Ryan Bodenheim. The Dying & The Dead is about an old man who takes on a mission from a species of ancient immortal beings in order to save his dying wife. That’s the hook and that’s basically the plot but that really doesn’t matter either because this is a book that must be experienced. Artist Bodenhiems illustrations are lush, immersive and impossible not to fall into as they transport you to it’s epic otherworldly setting while Hickman makes the set up intriguing and inviting. There’s traces of the crime element carrying over from Hickman & Bodenheim’s Secret and there is enough Hikmanism’s to make you dummy’s run for the hills but The Dying & The Dead is a beautiful entry point into another fantastic world courtesy of the creators that channels the spirit of the man called Moebius.He told you first in The Incal without straight up telling you “Nothing ends…nothing ever ends”