Tag Archives: Neil Gaiman

“The Sandman Murder”: A Crime, a Comic, and a Creator’s Conscience

Published by DC Comics in 1990, The Sandman #19, entitled “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” is arguably one of the best single issues of the acclaimed series; in 1991 the story won the World Fantasy Award for best short fiction — the first comic book to win the award. But shortly after it was published, a copy of the comic was found at a crime scene that shocked a small college community and the comic’s creators, part of an apparent effort to portray a murder as a comics-inspired suicide.

THE SANDMAN #19 – cover artist Dave McKean

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Neil Gaiman & Dave McKean’s Initial Violent Cases

Violent Cases cover Dave McKean
Dave McKean

Three decades ago a young writer and artist met in the offices of a telephone sales company. They were both novice talents in search of a way to break into the comic book medium. In this case, they were following up on reports that members of said phone firm were considering funding an “exciting” new anthology spotlighting fresh creators. As is often the case with such ventures, the anthology never panned out, but it did provide the opportunity for the writer and artist to have a chat. They decided they would like to work together, and, after a near miss or two, produced a graphic novel. First published 30 years ago, Violent Cases is the first collaboration between Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean, whose partnership has evolved over the following decades into one of the most distinctive in the medium’s history. Few others creators have been as closely associated with the other as they have. That history began with a tale of childhood, gangsters and that ever elusive thing called memory.

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Tuesday Top Fifteen: Our Favorite Creators Creighton

Nothing But Comics has hit our three year mark and in observance of the site’s anniversary, every Tuesday from now until we finish, one of our staff members will list off their favorite comics creators all time. Last week was Patrick, this week is Cosmo’s. Continue reading Tuesday Top Fifteen: Our Favorite Creators Creighton

Neil Gaiman Writing a Book on Norse Myth

Next February, W.W. Norton will publish Norse Mythology by acclaimed author Neil Gaiman (Sandman, Miracleman, American Gods). Gaiman’s approach is described as “an almost novelistic retelling of famous myths about the gods of Asgard.” Gaiman acknowledges a deep connection to this material which has roots in much of his work. Mythology in general has long been seen as a core element of Gaiman’s writing. Norse figures, in particular, played a small but pivotal role in the events of Sandman, while also appearing in his novel American Gods.

Sandman_61_p28(resize)
Marc Hempel

For more, see The New York Times.

Cheers

 

Indubitable Issues and Pull List (06/15/16)

LOOKING FOR BOOKS TO BUY THIS WEEK?  

LOOK NO FURTHER.  

HERE ARE SOME ISSUES THAT WILL NOT DISAPPOINT.

 
Dean’s Recommendation …
Batman1Batman #1
“I can’t wait to see what Tom King and David Finch can do with The Dark Knight.”
 
 

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Angela: An Angel’s Evolution

“Who can be anything forever?”

-Marguerite Bennett,

Angela: Queen of Hel #7

Angela Queen of Hel 1 Stephanie Hans(crop)
Stephanie Hans

 

When Angela first appeared 23 years ago in the pages of Spawn #9, it was a rather unassuming debut. Guest written by Neil Gaiman with art by Todd McFarlane, it was pretty representative of Image in its early days. My younger Sandman obsessed self snatched it up only to shrug my shoulders at the whole thing. My older (still Sandman obsessed self) had a similar reaction when revisiting it. In spite of all this, the character has of late gone through a rather fascinating evolution. Later creators have been able to mold what was originally an embarrassing example of 90s excess into an endearing character.

 

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Exploring the Miracleman Apocrypha

Miracleman Apocrypha trade Mark Buckingham
Mark Buckingham

Delays are nothing new to comic books. In the 90s, readers of From Hell quickly grew accustomed to waiting several months for the next installment of Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell’s historical opus. It took two years for the epilogue to surface. Less drastic, though still irregular was the final year of Sandman, during which I treated the release of a new issue as an unpredictable surprise. Neil Gaiman once observed that it took him three weeks to script a single issue of Sandman, which did leave me wondering how he had much time for the myriad other projects he was pursuing. (Still wish that Sweeny Todd adaptation he was planning with Michael Zulli had happened). Miracleman had already seen delays during the final Alan Moore arc Olympus, and this continued with Gaiman’s The Golden Age. One reader even wrote in saying that the series must be the “slowest comic ever”; editorial deflected by suggesting that Moore’s Big Numbers or “any Brian Bolland project” were much more protracted). However, as readers today also know, delays are often worth the wait. Olympus and The Golden Age are both outstanding storylines which rank amongst Moore and Gaiman’s best work. Also publisher Eclipse’s financial difficulties (bankruptcy would jarringly cut short Gaiman’s second arc The Silver Age after only two issues) should be taken into account as well. Regardless, Eclipse decided to put out a limited series that would help tide over fans between The Golden and Silver Age.

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Snyder and Capullo Announce New Creator-Owned Series ‘Totally Dark’

As writer Scott Snyder and artist Greg Capullo wrap up their acclaimed run on the DC Comics series Batman, the creative duo share the news that they are working together on a groundbreaking new creator-owned comics series that will challenge readers’ expectations of a comic book — the sci-fi horror mystery, Totally Dark.

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Life During Miracleman’s Golden Age

“I still don’t know what I was waiting for
And my time was running wild . . .”
-David Bowie , “Changes”

Miracleman 18 Dave McKean
Dave McKean

In 1982 a young British writer by the name of Alan Moore was tasked with revitalizing the dormant Marvelman property (now known as Miracleman). Over the course of the next several years, Moore would revamp Miracleman for contemporary times, explore the drive for survival and elevate the hero to the status of divinity. Coinciding with his iconic DC work of Swamp Thing, Watchmen and The Killing Joke, Miracleman remains one of Moore’s signature achievements. Moore departed the series on a breathtaking high note, in which Miracleman has become, for all intents and purpose, a god lording over humanity. And unlike Dr. Manhattan’s Enlightenment clockmaker deity, Miracleman had no qualms about employing a heavy hand to guide civilization. Truly, a new age had dawned.

 

If the Miracleman saga had ended there, it would have been deeply satisfying. Yet, publisher Eclipse preferred to continue the title. Once again, the series was given to an up-and-coming British scribe: Neil Gaiman. Teaming with artist Mark Buckingham, Gaiman began a six issue arc entitled The Golden Age. Despite the daunting task of following in the footsteps of Alan Moore at the height of his powers, Gaiman and Buckingham more than justify the continuation of the series. The Golden Age is a rich, deeply human take on the world. Most importantly it honors what Moore built, while still allowing Gaiman’s own voice to shine.

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