Tag Archives: politics

Akira Yoshida Presents: Seven Comics We’d Like to Give Donald Trump for Christmas

Editor’s Note:  “Akira Yoshida Presents” is a feature posted on behalf of guest contributor Akira Yoshida, who writes the blog posts other contributors don’t want to post using their real names….

As we approach the end of the year, it is common for comics blogs to prepare a list of their favorite comics. Such lists provide bloggers with an opportunity to recommend comics that they hope will provide entertainment and perspective to others.

During this holiday season, a time of peace and sharing, Nothing But Comics would like to make some respectful comics recommendations to President Donald Trump, in the hopes that these comics might entertain and enlighten America’s president.

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Revisiting Saucer Country

Saucer Country 12 Ryan Kelly
Ryan Kelly

In recent years, DC’s Vertigo imprint has lost a bit of the sheen from its acclaimed run in the 1990s. Originally launched in 1993, the brand built on existing titles, such as Sandman and Hellblazer, to cultivate a line of titles which could, more or less, stand independent of DC’s superheroes in both form and content. This strategy was an immediate success. In the following years, Vertigo published the likes of The Invisibles, Preacher and Lucifer; their name quickly became synonymous with the cutting edge. However, as it often does, time can dull what was once trendsetting. Vertigo still produces some excellent comics, such as The Unwritten or The Sheriff of Babylon. Another example would be Saucer Country from the team of Paul Cornell and Ryan Kelly. Saucer Country was a deep dive into the heady realm of UFO mythology. Writer Cornell deftly avoided many of the common traps of the genre, keeping the reader on their toes while maintaining their engagement through compelling characters and themes. The series returns to shelves this Wednesday, after a four year hiatus; first though, an examination of what made the first volume of the title so memorable.

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What would Donald Trump think about PREZ?

At Nothing But Comics, we enjoy reading the DC Comics series Prez.  Crafted by writer Mark Russell and artist Ben Caldwell, the sci-fi political satire follows the adventures of teenager Beth Ross after she is elected President of the United States in the year 2036.

With Democrat and Republican presidential candidates currently competing to get their respective party’s nomination, we dispatched superhero the Red Bee to ask Russell and Caldwell for their opinion on how a prominent Republican presidential candidate might respond to Beth Ross….

 

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270 Needed to Win: A Close Look at the Election Map in Prez

Maps reveal details about fictional worlds.  The maps provided in fantasy and science fiction stories – including fantasy and science fiction comics – help ground the story, giving readers a sense of the story’s setting and dynamics.  For example, an examination of the U.S. presidential election map presented in the first issue of the DC Comics series Prez offers details about the story’s political landscape. The map and the electoral votes won by the presidential candidates reveal that in the comic’s future setting, today’s “blue states” (that is, states that usually vote for Democratic candidates) have lost political power to today’s Republican “red states.”

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M.O.D.O.K. Interviews Chip Zdarsky about Howard the Duck’s Political Future

Comics creator and upcoming Howard the Duck writer Chip Zdarsky ran as a mock candidate for Mayor of Toronto in 2010, and Howard the Duck was a write-in candidate for President of the United States in 1976, so Marvel Comics super-villain M.O.D.O.K. reached out to Zdarsky via Twitter to ask the obvious question:

 

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